Full of something but definitely not stories

Greetings, fellow blog folk.

I’m writing this post from my sick bed (ie. duvet on the sofa in front of the footie). Once again, I’ve gone and contracted the winter lurgy (in spring), and I’m currently drowning in tissues full of…

Anyway.

What I am not currently full of is stories, which is seriously frustrating because I need to write three in the next two weeks to meet a competition deadline.

No pressure.

Which is probably the issue.

But anyway, to get things moving I’ve been up to the study and grabbed this little beauty:

(Yes, that’s Welford curled up in the background, keeping me company / pinching all the leg room, and oh look! A tissue!)

I opened the book at random and came to the following exercise (easier to photograph than explain since I’m typing this on my phone – I’m not being lazy, honest!):

So I’m going to give it a go and see what I end up with, and if I’m feeling brave then I’ll post the results – whatever they may be 🤣

Just a quick shameless plug for The Case of Blue Ben, the 4th instalment in the Riley Pope Case Files, which came out last week and can be downloaded for free (along with the first three books in brand new revised editions) from Smashwords in epub or mobi format now.

Later 🤘

Am I on a train or in the Tri Cities?

I’ve just had a pretty mad weekend of reading – it’s rare that I have (or find) the time to spend an entire day reading, but yesterday, apart from a bit of housework, I essentially sat on my arse and power read.

First, I finished the second half of the Mercy Thompson book, Blood Bound. Then I started The Girl on the Train… and by midnight I’d finished it.

Like I say, it’s rare for me to spend so long immersed in a book, so I wasn’t expecting to feel the way I did this morning, which was weirdly disconnected and just not ‘with it’.

I can’t put it down to anything obvious. I don’t feel ill and there’s nothing beyond the usual on my mind, I’m not drunk and I’ve never taken anything stronger than a paracetamol in my life, so I can only put this weird disconnected feeling down to the fact that I spent a good eight hours emersed in the worlds of Patricia Briggs’ Tri Cities werewolves and then Paula Hawkins’ screwed-up trio of Rachel, Megs and Anna.

Does anyone else suffer this or is it just me? What can we call it? A book hangover?

Anyway, I did something unusual and reviewed both books on Goodreads (check out my feed to see what I thought, and don’t forget to follow me!). I don’t normally leave reviews because I tend to forget half the good stuff but always remember the bad, so for my next book I’ve decided to make notes as I go along and see what I end up with, because I’m sad like that.

Writing-wise, I’ve just written a 7500 word paranormal romance (it wasn’t meant to be a PR but the story just took me in that direction) so I’ll get it polished then see if I can place it somewhere. The WIP is still being pulled into shape and I’m picking up the 4th Riley Pope tomorrow. I have 9 days to go in the day job before I have a fortnight off and two blissful weeks of solid writing, which can’t come soon enough. I’ve also swallowed my nerves and booked the tickets for the Bridge House author event. I’ve no idea what to expect but I guess I’ll worry (excessively) about that in December!

(And don’t forget, my urban fantasy series The Riley Pope Case Files is free to download from Smashwords and ebook stockists everywhere!)

X

Available NOW! Books 1 – 3 of The Riley Pope Case Files!

Woohoo! I’m officially a published (indie) author!

Books 1 – 3 of The Riley Pope Case Files are now available to download exclusively from Amazon, or if you’re subscribed to Kindle Unlimited you can read them all for FREE! I’ll be running a free book promotion on ‘The Case of Walutahanga’ from tomorrow which lasts for five days, so please spread the word and drop me a review, good, bad or indifferent. Here’s a little overview…

The Case of Walutahanga

Riley Pope inherited her talent for cryptozoology from her father. As for her penchant for vice and a weakness for dangerous men, well, she can’t blame that on him. Now that Riley is young, free and single, she’s determined to clean up her life and make amends for the sins of her past; if her past will let her.

When a small English town is beset by unusual weather, Riley’s employers, the enigmatic Firm, despatch her to investigate. She soon discovers that a cryptid is involved, but the creatures holding it hostage won’t give it up without a fight, and thanks to a charming but deadly fallen angel, Riley isn’t sure how much fight she has left…

 

The Case of Ahuizotl

Riley Pope has seen some strange things in her life – as a cryptozoologist, it comes with the territory – but this could be her strangest case yet.

When the bodies of two naked men wash ashore on the sands of Whitby harbour – both missing parts of their anatomies – Riley is despatched to investigate. The only scrap of evidence of cryptid involvement is the drunken account of a local trawlerman – who quickly disappears.

Riley finds herself in a race against time to identify the cryptid and save it from the murderous intentions of The Firm’s hired kill squad, but Agent Mulhoon, commander of Alpha team, has other ideas, putting Riley in the kind of danger she’s been trying to avoid since escaping from her fallen angel lover. Bastien Cort is never far from Riley’s thoughts; but this time he might be even closer than she fears…

The Case of the Brollachan

Cryptozoologist Riley Pope is used to tracking down otherworldly creatures: from serpents to shapeshifters, boggarts to Bigfoot, she’s pretty much dealt with them all. But this time, it isn’t a cryptid she’s hunting…

Riley’s employers, the clandestine Firm, have received reports of terrifying creatures frightening the children of Castlebay, Scotland. Sent to investigate, Riley confirms the presence of a malevolent spirit of the otherkind that preys on its victim’s worst fears… and Riley has a lot to be scared of.

Out of her depth and in fear of what’s lurking in the hills beyond Castlebay, Riley does her best to contain the situation – only to draw the attention of Mulhoon, commander of Alpha team, who ends up putting his life and that of his team in mortal danger. Faced with leaving the reckless Mulhoon to his fate, or confronting her own private fears, Riley must make a decision… whatever the consequence.

A Kate of many hats!

I was talking with a friend the other week. She’d seen a couple of posts on social media that I’d made of some Riley Pope cover art and asked me when the books were out (December, if you’re interested). I won’t go into detail, but long story short she was surprised that I had to get involved in the editing, proofreading, cover art creation, etc etc. “I thought all you had to do was write and someone else did all the other stuff.”

I chose to self-publish my Riley Pope series for a number of reasons:

  1. They’re coming in around 9,000 words each and I wouldn’t know where to try and get that length of work published (outside of competitions and magazines where there are no guarantees of publication)
  2. I’ve been messing around with comps and the never-ending novel long enough now and just want to get my work out into the public domain.
  3. I’d quite like to make a little cash, no matter how small an amount, from the hours and the effort I’ve invested.

I don’t think there’s quite as much stigma around self-publishing these days as there used to be. There’s a lot of work out there of equal quality to that of the traditional publishers, and I’m betting that the authors are all the more better off for it. There’s also a large pile of poorly written, unproofed, badly designed dross that’s the fuel for the stigma that I mentioned, and whilst it’s no excuse for publishing substandard products I can sort of understand why there are people that do it.

Hats that I have worn in the last two months:

  1. Author hat
  2. Editor hat
  3. Proofreader hat
  4. Cover art designer hat
  5. Blurb writer hat
  6. KDP manuscript converter hat
  7. Website design hat
  8. Twitter hat
  9. Facebook hat
  10. Curl up in a corner and cry hat

Some of these hats are easy to wear; they fit me and suit me and I’m happy to wear them. Author hat needs no explanation. Editor hat, ditto. I’m a recently qualified proofreader, and whilst it isn’t easy to proof your own work, I’m confident enough in the process to feel like I did a good job. I don’t very much like Twitter hat; probably because I don’t much like Twitter. My Facebook page is brand new and shiny (and just waiting for your shares and likes, hint hint) but I’m on there all the time so it wasn’t so difficult to set up a page. Website design hat? I’ll leave that up to your interpretation (please be nice!).

Cover art design hat was a learning curve. I’m not a designer and I’ve no skill at all in programs like Photoshop. Where, then, could I create my ebook covers? Which option should I choose? What size did it need to be? And graphics. Where did I get those from?

I ended up on Canva, which is free, and found they had a ready made template for Kindle ebook covers. They offer free graphics and images but none were what I wanted so I headed over to Shutterstock and spent whole days browsing graphics for my covers. I eventually settled on a theme for the series and sought out suitable artwork. I then bought a licence that allowed me to download five images. If I use one image per book then I think it works out about £7 a book. It took me some time to get my cover art just how I wanted, especially when I realised how unreadable the font was when shrunk down to icon size.

Blurb writer hat – I imagine its about as painful as wearing synopsis writer hat. I haven’t had to wear that one yet, and I am not looking forwards to it either. Blurb? Bleugh! Enough said.

I’m still getting over my stint wearing KDP manuscript converter hat. If you’ve never had to do it, I envy you. If you have then I sympathise. I’ve gotten used to writing my drafts in 12 pt Calibri, l.5 line spacing, tabbing to indent paragraphs and holding down the enter key to start a new page.

But KDP doesn’t like that. You must entirely strip your poor MS of all formatting and start again from scratch, inserting page breaks, removing any white space longer than three lines, and changing all the thousands of paragraph indents from tabbed to first line indents. There’s probably a simple way to do it, but I was learning, so I did it step-by-step. By step. By torturous step. I now have a Kindle template saved for just such a job, so wearing my KDP hat in the future shouldn’t be such an issue.

I had no intention of wearing my curl up in the corner and cry hat, until I realised just how close I was to having published work available for purchase. Assuming there are people out there good enough to buy my work, then self-assessment tax hat is looming in the distance.

“I thought all you had to do was write,” said my friend.

If only!

Later! xXx